Research Scholarships

Botany Research Scholarship Program

Northern California Botanists provides competitive botany and plant ecology research scholarships to undergraduate and graduate students attending a college and university. Research scholarships will be funded by NCB with the goals of encouraging undergraduate students to pursue academic endeavors toward a career in botany, promoting undergraduate and graduate botany and plant ecology research, and implementing objectives of the NCB mission.

The geographic range for defining the Northern California Botanists (NCB) area of interest for student research scholarships includes the area extending northward--from the southern boundary of San Luis Obispo County and western slope of the Tehachapi Mountains, following the eastern slope of the Sierra Nevada, to the southern boundary of Mono County. Students from any accredited college or university doing research within the NCB geographic range may apply for NCB student research scholarships.

Research scholarships consist of $1,000 awards, designed to support basic undergraduate and graduate research. Students may reapply and receive a scholarship award up to a maximum of two years for undergraduates and graduates pursuing a Masters degree and up to a maximum of four years for graduate students pursuing a Doctorate degree.

2014 - 2015 Research Scholarship applications now available!

Northern California Botanists are accepting applications for our Botany Research Scholarship Program for the 2014 - 2015 academic year. All materials should be submitted to ncbotanists@gmail.com or by mail to Northern California Botanists, P. O. Box 8042, Chico, CA 95927-8042 by midnight March 31, 2014. See the application packet for more details on application guidelines and requirements.

The Shasta Chapter of the California Native Plant Society will again fund an additional scholarship for research relevant to the flora within the boundaries of the Shasta Chapter (Shasta, Lassen, Modoc, and Siskiyou counties) and/or is a student from the Shasta Chapter area. For more information about this special scholarship, visit the Shasta Chapter website and click on the Applications tab. Please indicate in your cover letter and on the application form that you qualify for the Shasta Chapter scholarship.

Congratulations to our 2013 - 2014 Scholarship Recipients

NCB received 29 applications for the 2013 - 2014 Scholarship Program. As usual, there were many great research projects to choose from and it made it hard to narrow it down to the final awardee list. We awarded ten $1,000 scholarships for for the 2013 - 2014 school year. The Shasta Chapter of the California Native Plant Society funded one of the scholarships for research relevant to the flora within the boundaries of the Shasta Chapter (Shasta, Lassen, Modoc, and Siskiyou counties).

Congratulations to the ten students and thank you to all that submitted applications!

We are pleased to announce the awardees, along with their degree program and college or university, and the title of their research project. Abstracts of their research are included in our Fall 2013 Newsletter.

Angelita Ashbacher Ph.D. University of California, Santa Cruz
The effects of climate change on wildflower fitness: the role of plant-pollinator interactions.

Stanford Bronwen Ph.D. University of California, Santa Cruz
The effect of compensatory mitigation on wetland landscape position and function.

Kelsy McDonald M.S. Humboldt State University
Tidal seed dispersal of Spartina densiflora

Jason Mills M.S. Chico State University
Re-establishing the competitive hierarchy in an invaded California grassland through the process of habitat resotoration following the prescribed burn of Centaurea solstitialis.

Rachel Olliff M.S. University of California, Davis
Phenological cuing in Lathyrus littoralis and one of its important pollinators, Habropoda miserabilis, in the coastal dunes of Humboldt Bay.

Juliet Oshiro Ph.D. University of California, Santa Cruz
Climate change and plant phenology in Santa Cruz County, California.

Lars Rosengreen M.S. San Jose State University
Is yellow more mellow? Exploring the relationship between corolla color and stress tolerance in skunky monkey flower (Diplacus mephiticus).

Scott Simono M.S. San Francisco State University
Morphological, cytological, and molecular evidence for redefining the identity of the red-flowered Silene (Caryophyllacaea) in California .

**Jane Van Susteren M.S. San Francisco State University - Shasta Chapter CNPS Scholarship
Cliff notes on California's Sedum.

Catherine Wade Ph.D. University of California, Santa Cruz
Impacts of snow and rain change on native and invasive sagebrush steppe fire fuel properties.

Past Recipients

2012-2013

(abstracts of their research are included in our Fall 2012 Newsletter)

Jennifer Balachowski Ph.D. University of California, Davis
Restoring for the future: evolutionary ecology of Elymus glaucus, and composite provenancing as a tool for native grassland restoration.

Juliana Moreno & Leena McCann Undergraduates Santa Clara University
Sympatric speciation in northern California columbines.

Meghan Parish M. S. Sonoma State University
Functional traits, disturbance, and invasion: response of exotic grasses to mowing and herbicide in an invaded California grassland.

Lee Ripma M. S. San Diego State University
A phylogenetic analysis of the plant genus Cryptantha Oreocarya group (Boraginaceae).

Sean Ryan M.S. San Diego State University
Molecular phylogeny and character evolution of Fritillaria subgenus Liliorhiza (Liliaceae).

Brett Smith M.S. University of California, Santa Cruz
Gene flow and hybridization in a rare, serpentine endemic Monardella.

Jens Stevens Ph.D. University of California, Davis
Interacting effects of snowpack, fire, and forest management on plant invasions in the Sierra Nevada.

2011-2012

Meredith Gosejohan M.S. University of Nevada, Reno
Plant community dynamics in Modoc Plateau vernal pools: evaluating ecohydrology, vegetation structure, and Orcuttia tenius seed bank distribution.

Kristie Haydu M.S. California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo
Modeling plant biodiversity hot spots in San Luis Obispo County.

Diana Jolles Ph. D. Claremont Graduate University
Foliar and floral adaptations to environmental heterogeneity among cryptic lineages of the Pyrola picta species complex (Ericaceae).

Rosa Schneider M. S. San Francisco State University
Investigating causes of rarity in an endemic wetland thistle.

Rebecca Stubbs M. S. San Francisco State University
From sea level to mountain peaks: the evolution and biogeography of the rare Polemoniums.

Marit Wilkerson Ph.D. University of California, Davis
Plant invasion in conservation linkages: what have we been overlooking?.

Jenn Yost Ph.D. University of California, Santa Cruz
Edaphic adaptations and speciation in California goldfields.

2010-2011

Carla Fresquez Ph. D. University of California, Santa Cruz
High marsh—upland ecotonal community dynamics: seed bank analysis and native and non-native germination and seedling physiological tolerances.

Barbara Going Ph. D. University of California, Davis
Climate change and California grassland: are some communities more resistant than others?

Matt Guilliams Ph. D. University of California, Berkeley
Phylogenetic relationships and ecological speciation of the popcorn flowers (Plagiobothrys, Boraginaceae).

Tim Hanson M. S. California State University, Chico
Assessing the ecology and life history traits of a rare California endemic, Monardella douglasii ssp. venosa (Lamiaceae).

Allison Kidder Ph. D. University of California, Berkeley
Water relations of Baccharis pilularis DC seedling establishment in a changing climate.

Luc Lagarde M. S. Humboldt State University
Developing tools for the estimation of the impact of invasive Spartina densiflora on the primary productivity of a Northern California salt marsh.

Susan Magnoli M. S. Sonoma State University
Residual and community-level effects of iceplant on a coastal dune ecosystem in California.

2009-2010

Erin Gottschalk-Fisher M. S. California State University, Chico
Sacramento Wildlife Refuge Complex vernal pool restoration for Neostapfia colusana and Tuctoria greenei.

Dena Grossenbacher Ph. D. University of California, Davis
A test of pollinator-mediated community assemblage patterns in three California genera: Limnanthes, Mimulus, and Clarkia.

Maya Hayden Ph. D. University of California, Berkeley
Abandoned channels as an alternate recruitment pathway for pioneer riparian forest.

Jeremiah Mann Ph. D. University of California, Davis
Pre-commercial screening of the leading biofuel crop Miscanthus X giganteus for invasive plant traits.

Michal Shuldman Ph. D. University of California, Berkeley
Differences in plant functional traits between multiple populations of Heteromeles arbutifolia.

Jenn Yost Ph. D. University of California, Santa Cruz
Relationships among Dudleya species: the role of hybridization and polyploidy in speciation.

Johann Zaroli Senior. San Jose State University
Assessing the impact of nutrient enrichment on native and invasive species in California's serpentine grasslands.

2008-2009

Gavin Archbald M.S. San Francisco State University
Evaluating the potential for spread of an invasive forb, Limonium ramosissimum, in San Francisco Bay salt marshes.

Christopher Dolanc Ph.D. University of California, Davis
Current and future vegetation change in Sierran subalpine due to changing climate.

Steven Johnston M.S. Sonoma State University
Evolutionary ecology of a host-pathogen interaction in California woodlands.

Laura Saunders M.S. Sonoma State University
The effects of mammalian herbivory on the growth and establishment of oaks.

Lisa Schile Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley
Tidal wetland vegetation response to climate change in the San Francisco Bay-Delta.

Marit Wilkerson Ph.D. University of California, Davis
Downsides to habitat corridors' potential for exotic plant invasion.

Cara Witte M.S. Humboldt State University
Floristic inventory of Horse Mtn., Board Camp Mtn., and surrounding areas, with special consideration to plants on serpentine outcrops.